Archive for the ‘Arduino / Freeduino’ Category

NKC Ethernet Shield for Arduino Assembly Guide

Wednesday, April 22nd, 2009

This is the assembly guide for the NKC Ethernet Shield for Arduino DIY KIT.

This shield is based on the WIZ812MJ module and shares the same W5100 TCP/IP chip with the official Arduino Ethernet Shield, making it 100% compatible. The current Arduino Ethernet Shield doesn’t work with the Arduino MEGA (a hack is possible, but some wiring is needed, as well as a small modification to the Ethernet library code). The NKC shield was designed to avoid this extra wiring and make it physically work with both the Arduino boards (and all its derivatives) and the Arduino MEGA board.

The KIT (purchase) comes with all the components, as shown in the next picture:

kit

Start by opening the plastic poach and removing all the components on the table. Select the PCB, the 3.3V voltage regulator (TO-220 format) and the 2 x 100uF electrolytic capacitors.

Solder these components, make sure that the capacitors are correctly oriented, as they are polarized (long leg is positive, short leg negative. Also negative has a band on the capacitor body).

kit

Next proceed with the LEDs, resistors and tactile switch. The switch is for resetting both the Arduino board and the Ethernet shield. The red LED is for LED13, the same LED13 that you have in your Arduino board is available on the Shield, as it indicates SPI activity. The 2 blue LEDs are for the Ethernet TX and RX activity indicators. The resistors are for limiting the current to these LEDs.

kit

Now solder the 4 2×5 female sockets. Before applying solder, make sure they are correctly aligned.

kit

It is time to solder the long legged pin headers: 2 x 8-pin, 2 x 6-pin and 1 x 2×3-pin (this one goes upside down!). There is also a 4-pin male header and a jumper or shunt.

kit

The shield is ready. Plug the jumper in “Duemilanove” position (1-2). Insert the WIZ812MJ module as shown:

kit

kit

This is how it looks, mounted on a Freeduino board (Arduino diecimila, duemilanove, seeeduino, etc):

kit

and the next step is to open the Arduino IDE, load some Ethernet library based sketch and enjoy your new Ethernet Shield.

If you have the Arduino MEGA board

This is how it looks:

kit

You can keep the jumper in the Duemilanove setting.

kit

1. Locate spi.h file (it is located under Arduino installation directory –> hardware –> libraries –> Ethernet –> utility)
2. Rename it as spi_orig.h
3. Download spiMEGA.h
4. Rename spiMEGA.h as spi.h
5. Delete all .o files from utility and Ethernet directories
6. Start the Arduino IDE
7. Load or program your Ethernet Library based shield
8. Compile –> upload sketch to the MEGA –> and Voila!!!
9. Enjoy your Arduino board connected to the NET

The jumper in MEGA position, together with the last pin (4) on the 4-pin male header, is when you cannot keep the SS signal (SPI) on Digital pin 10 and need to move it to the default position, which is digital pin 53 on the MEGA.

If this is the case, then download a different spi.h file named spiMEGAold.h, place the jumper in MEGA (2-3) position, and connect a wire from pin 4 on the Shield to digital pinn 53 on the MEGA:

kit

kit

Arduino Ethernet Shield MEGA hack

Monday, April 6th, 2009

The Arduino MEGA was announced officially on March 26th, 2009. The MEGA kept the odd pin header spacing to make it compatible with most Arduino shields. But unfortunately, some pins had to be moved and this movement made some shields that use SPI incompatible. One of the most popular shields, the Arduino Ethernet shield is one of the incompatible shields, as it relies on SPI for Arduino to Ethernet communication. The good news is that it is possible to make it work with the MEGA and here is the procedure:

Ingredients

  • Arduino MEGA board
  • Arduino Ethernet shield
  • 4 x male2male jumper wires
ingredients

ingredients

First the Hardware hack

The SPI signals SCK, MISO, MOSI and SS are located in pins 13, 12, 11 and 10 on the Arduino Diecimila/Duemilanove or compatible boards like freeduino and seeeduino.
These signals moved to pins 52, 50, 51 and 53 on the Arduino MEGA.
Signals SCK, MISO and MOSI are available in the ICSP 2×3 pin header also, but signal SS is missing from this header, and only available on pin 53.

As the Arduino Ethernet shield expects to get these signals from pins 13 to 10, we need to re-wire them to pins 50 to 53.

First, we need to disconnect pins 13 to 10 in the Arduino Ethernet Shield:

these4pins

these4pins

Bend them slightly to the outside:

these4pinsside

these4pinsside

And plug the Arduino Ethernet shield to the Arduino MEGA, so these 4 pins remains unplugged:

plug

plug

Now, how are we going to get the SPI signals? From pins 50 to 53… following the next mapping:

MEGA pin 50 (MISO) to Arduino Ethernet Shield pin 12.
MEGA pin 51 (MOSI) to Arduino Ethernet Shield pin 11.
MEGA pin 52 (SCK) to Arduino Ethernet Shield pin 13.
MEGA pin 53 (SS) to Arduino Ethernet Shield pin 10.

wires1

wires1

wires2

wires2

wires3

wires3

Now the Hardware hack is complete, but there is one more change we need to do, as the original Ethernet Library included with the Arduino IDE has hardcoded the SPI signals. We need to change these hardcoded signals to match the new position in the Arduino MEGA.

Software Hack

Locate the file spi.h in the hardware/libraries/Ethernet/utility directory, under your Arduino 0015 installation.

Find and replace the following 5 lines:


#define SPI0_SS_BIT BIT2
...
#define SPI0_SCLK_BIT BIT5
...
#define SPI0_MOSI_BIT BIT3
...
#define SPI0_MISO_BIT BIT4
...
#define IINCHIP_CS_BIT BIT2

and replace them with this code:


#define SPI0_SS_BIT BIT0
...
#define SPI0_SCLK_BIT BIT1
...
#define SPI0_MOSI_BIT BIT2
...
#define SPI0_MISO_BIT BIT3
...
#define IINCHIP_CS_BIT BIT0

These 5 lines are in a non-consecutive order in the spi.h file.

After you save the edited spi.h file, remove all .o files in the utility and Ethernet directory.

Open the Arduino 0015 IDE (The Arduino MEGA requires Arduino 0015), and load your preferred Ethernet sketch or try this example that I use (You need to change the IP address to reflect the values in your network):

#include <Ethernet.h>

byte mac[] = { 0xDE, 0xAD, 0xBE, 0xEF, 0xFE, 0xED };
byte ip[] = { 192, 168, 1, 50 }; // Change this parameters to reflect your network values
byte server[] = { 64, 233, 187, 99 }; // Google

Client client(server, 80);

void setup()
{
Ethernet.begin(mac, ip);
Serial.begin(9600);

delay(1000);

Serial.println("connecting...");

if (client.connect()) {
Serial.println("connected");
client.println("GET /search?q=arduino HTTP/1.0");
client.println();
} else {
Serial.println("connection failed");
}
}

void loop()
{
if (client.available()) {
char c = client.read();
Serial.print(c);
}

if (!client.connected()) {
Serial.println();
Serial.println("disconnecting.");
client.stop();
for(;;)
;
}
}

Compile and upload the sketch. Activate the Serial Monitor, set baud to 9600 and you should see the Google search result, in html format, like in the following screen capture:

ide

ide

And the complete hack while getting information from Google:

working

working

This concludes the Arduino Ethernet Shield MEGA hack.

You can purchase the Arduino MEGA here and the Arduino Ethernet Shield here

April 14th, 2009 UPDATE
The previous hack requires moving 4 signals: SCK, MOSI, MISO and SS. As SS is used by AVR only when working SPI in SLAVE mode, I decided to try a new simpler hack, and move only 3 signals: SCK, MOSI and MISO, and use digital pin 10 as SS. This way, only 3 pins need to be bended: 13, 12 and 11.

At the beginning this seemed to be a simple modification to the original hack, but mysteriously it didn’t work. Assigning SPI0_SS_BIT and IINCHIP_CS_BIT to BIT4 (corresponding to digital pin 10 on the Arduino MEGA), the Arduino Ethernet shield couldn’t be initialized, so the sketch didn’t work (It never returned from Ethernet.begin()). After doing some research, I found that the SS pin is also used when setting AVR in SPI master mode, but only before setting bit 4 of register SPCR (Master mode) required this pin SS to be HIGH. So I tricked some more code to make it work (force SS HIGH before setting bit 4 in SPCR register to HIGH).

Hardware hack

Follow hardware hack instructions above, but only bend pins 13, 12 and 11. Wire the pins as instructed, except for the 4th wire from Arduino MEGA pin 53 to Ethernet Shield pin 10 (as this pin is not bended in this new hack).

Software hack

Forget all the changes suggested above, and follow this new changes:
Find and replace the following 6 lines:


#define SPI0_SS_BIT BIT2
...
#define SPI0_SCLK_BIT BIT5
...
#define SPI0_MOSI_BIT BIT3
...
#define SPI0_MISO_BIT BIT4
...
#define IINCHIP_CS_BIT BIT2
...
PORTB |= SPI0_SS_BIT; PORTB &= ~(SPI0_SCLK_BIT|SPI0_MOSI_BIT);\

and replace them with this code:


#define SPI0_SS_BIT BIT4
...
#define SPI0_SCLK_BIT BIT1
...
#define SPI0_MOSI_BIT BIT2
...
#define SPI0_MISO_BIT BIT3
...
#define IINCHIP_CS_BIT BIT4
...
PORTB |= SPI0_SS_BIT | BIT0; PORTB &= ~(SPI0_SCLK_BIT|SPI0_MOSI_BIT);\

By adding BIT0, we force pin SS to be HIGH when the SPCR register is set for AVR to behave like SPI master device.

I hope you find the new addition simpler to execute than the original hack.

If there is an Arduino MEGA, then there should be a MEGAshield

Monday, March 16th, 2009

Hi, I just saw the picture of the Arduino MEGA featured in hack-a-day

If there is an Arduino MEGA, then for sure you need a MEGAshield. Here are some pictures of the NKC MEGAShield:

MEGAshield PCB

MEGAshield 1

MEGAshield 2

MEGAshield 3

MEGAshield 4

Half Stackable MEGAShield = Monster MEGAShield (As called by ladyada)

I installed long legged 6-pin and 8-pin headers to make the Arduino MEGAshield stackable on the left half side (legacy Arduino side?). Here are some pictures:

MEGAshield 5

MEGAshield 6

MEGAshield 7

MEGAshield 8

Assembling the NKC Electronics XBee Shield V3.0 KIT

Thursday, March 12th, 2009

Assembling the NKC Electronics XBee Shield V3.0 KIT

A new version of this kit is available as V4

The NKC Electronics XBee Shield V3.0 KIT is an enhanced version of the original Arduino XBee Shield. It is sold in a DIY kit format and it comes with all the components required to assemble a full XBee Shield that is pin-compatible with all Arduino format compliant boards (Arduino, Freeduino, Seeeduino, etc).
First, unpack the kit

Xbee Shield V3.0 KIT

and start with the PCB.

Let’s start with the power portion of the schematic using the following parts:

IC1 TLV2217-33 Voltage Regulator (TO-220 package)
C1 100nF ceramic capacitor
C2, C3 10uF electrolytic capacitor

xbee shield v3.0 KIT

Next continue with the transistor, LEDs and other discrete components:

xbee shield v3.0 KIT

R1 10K resistor
R2 15K resistor
R3, R4 1K resistor
R5 330ohm resistor
RSSI 3mm LED
ASSOCIATE 3mm LED blue (transparent)
T1 BC547 transistor
reset tactile switch

Solder the sockets and pin headers:

xbee shield v3.0 KIT

Next step: Insert the jumpers:

xbee shield v3.0 KIT

There are 4 jumpers. J1 and J2 are for upgrading the firmware on the XBee module. Leave open for normal operation (both J1 and J2 open).

xbee shield v3.0 KIT

Pay special attention to the alignment of the female headers. The 2×3 female socket must be placed with the female portion facing down. This board takes some signals from the ICSP connector, so this socket is mandatory.

And this is the final picture of the XBee Shield V3.0 assembled and ready to use. XBee module is not included in the kit and must be purchased separately.

xbee shield v3.0 KIT

http://www.nkcelectronics.com/

Assembling the Freeduino Serial v2.0 Board (MAX232)

Thursday, March 12th, 2009

Assembling the ArduinoTM Diecimila Compatible Freeduino Serial v2.0 Board

SCHEMATICS (click on images to enlarge)
freeduino serial schematic

The Arduino diecimila compatible Freeduino serial board is a special version of the Arduino serial board designed by NKC Electronics. The board is diecimila compatible (autoreset) and includes the 13 digital pin LED for easy diagnostics and basic LED sketch execution. The v2.0 board uses a MAX232 compatible chip for interfacing with RS232. The older v1.0 board used two transistors, but had some reliability issues with auto-reset and sketch uploading.
First, unpack the kit

freeduino serial KIT

and start with the PCB.

Let’s start with the power portion of the schematic using the following parts:

DC1 DC power jack
D1 1N4004 diode
C5 100nF ceramic capacitor
C6, C7 47uF (or 33uF or 22uF) electrolytic capacitor
IC2 7805 5V positive voltage regulator
Power LED 3mm LED
R2 330 ohm resistor

Freeduino serial KIT

Plug a wall plug voltage regulator (+7V to +12V). The LED lights up, indicating that the Power supply is working.
NOTE: This board is shields friendly as the 7805 voltage regulator is mounted horizontally.

Next continue with the soldering of the RS232 components:

Freeduino serial KIT

X1 DB9 female PCB adapter
IC3 16-pin IC socket
C4, C8, C9, C10, C11, C12 0.1uF (100nF) ceramic capacitors

Solder the rest of the components:

Freeduino serial KIT

R3 1.5Kohm resistor
R4, R6 1 Kohm resistor
R5 10 Kohm resistor
C2, C3 22pF ceramic capacitor
C1 0.1uF (100nF) ceramic capacitor
13 3mm LED (Arduino pin 13 status LED)
Q1 16 MHz crystal
RESET Reset switch
IC1 28-pin IC socket
ICSP 2×3 pin male header

Now solder the headers and sockets:

POWER & Analog In 6-pin female header
Digital 2 x 8-pin female header

Freeduino serial KIT

Pay special attention to the alignment of the female headers.

Freeduino serial KIT

And finally install the ATMEGA168/ATmega328P MCU and the MAX232 (or HIN232 / ICL232 / ICL3232) chips.

Freeduino serial KIT

Freeduino serial KIT

The board is ready to be used. Start the Arduino IDE and load the BLINK sketch from the examples directory. Verify that ATMEGA168 (or Duemilanove with ATmega328) is selected in Tools –> Microcontroller (MCU) and Arduino Diecimila in the Tools –> board option. Select the COM port number corresponding to the serial interface where the Freeduino serial board is connected to. Press the “Upload to I/O board” button in Arduino and the board should autoreset and complete the programming. If you selected correctly the BLINK sketch, the LED “13” must start blinking once every 2 second (0.5Hz).

The board has space for an optional 3.3V regulator (78L33 TO-92 footprint) with it’s associated decoupling 0.1uF capacitor (C13).

Freeduino serial KIT

http://www.nkcelectronics.com/arduino.html